INFOGRAPHICS
Strategic Infographics
October 8, 2023
© Photo: SCF

The total debt of the U.S. government has increased from $5.7 trillion to $33.1 trillion over the past 22 years and keeps growing. The U.S. Treasury explains: “Simply put, the national debt is similar to a person using a credit card for purchases and not paying off the full balance each month. The cost of purchases exceeding the amount paid off represents a deficit, while accumulated deficits over time represents a person’s overall debt.” It fails to add that an average person is not allowed to print their own money…

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The Growth of U.S. Public Debt: From George W. Bush to Joe Biden

The total debt of the U.S. government has increased from $5.7 trillion to $33.1 trillion over the past 22 years and keeps growing. The U.S. Treasury explains: “Simply put, the national debt is similar to a person using a credit card for purchases and not paying off the full balance each month. The cost of purchases exceeding the amount paid off represents a deficit, while accumulated deficits over time represents a person’s overall debt.” It fails to add that an average person is not allowed to print their own money…

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(Click on the image to enlarge)

The total debt of the U.S. government has increased from $5.7 trillion to $33.1 trillion over the past 22 years and keeps growing. The U.S. Treasury explains: “Simply put, the national debt is similar to a person using a credit card for purchases and not paying off the full balance each month. The cost of purchases exceeding the amount paid off represents a deficit, while accumulated deficits over time represents a person’s overall debt.” It fails to add that an average person is not allowed to print their own money…

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(Click on the image to enlarge)

The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.

See also

March 1, 2024
February 26, 2024
February 12, 2024

See also

March 1, 2024
February 26, 2024
February 12, 2024
The views of individual contributors do not necessarily represent those of the Strategic Culture Foundation.